Aug 132010
 

Who is the best Shooter in the NHL?

If you were asked, who is the best shooter in the NHL you might answer Alexander Ovechkin since he has been the most prolific goal scorer since the lockout.  What Ovechkin also always does though is take far more shots than anyone else resulting in a shooting percentage that is for more ordinary.  This past season he was 50th in overall shooting percentage and in 2007-08 he was 46th and those are the only two times he cracked the top 50.  So is Ovechkin a great shooter, or simply great at finding opportunities to shoot?  And if Ovechkin isn’t the best shooter, who is?

Shooting percentage is a very common statistic which essentially is just goals scored divided by shots taken.  We all know and understand that.  Corsi numbers were initially conceived by former NHL goalie and current Buffalo Sabre goalie coach Jim Corsi as a method of evaluating goalie fatigue and has since become a frequently discussed statistic among hockey stat nuts, particularly those at Behind the Net.  Essentially what Corsi takes into account is shots directed at the net, not just shots on the net.  So, Corsi also takes into account missed shots (i.e. shots that go wide) and blocked shots (i.e. shots blocked by a defender).  Corsi numbers are often considered a good indicator of which team controls the play more (if you control the play you will get more shots and shot attempts than your opponent).  Corsi numbers were then revised by Matt Fenwick from the Battle of Alberta blog to not include blocked shots as it was found that including blocked shots in Corsi numbers correlation with winning percentage.  So it came to be that shots plus missed shots are generally referred to as Fenwick numbers and shots plus missed shots plus blocked shots are generally referred to as Corsi numbers.  That is the terminology I will use here.

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