Jun 102009
 

Ever since Jerry Moyes decided to take the Phoenix Coyotes to bankruptcy the NHL has chosen to take a hard line against the Moyes-Balsillie scheme but when it comes to the court proceedings their hard line stance has been softened by the judge.

Initially the NHL claimed vehemently that Jerry Moyes did not have the authority to take the team to bankruptcy because the league was in control of the team and had been in control of the team since last November. Moyes argued that he had given up some control of the team, but had not given up the right to file for bankruptcy. The NHL requested a hearing on the issue and essentially Judge Redfield T. Baum to toss out the bankruptcy filing. The judge chose not to make a ruling and instead decided to order the two sides to mediation which essentially didn’t resolve anything and left things pretty much status quo. That being that the team would remain in bankruptcy and court will proceed with the next issue.

The next issue was whether the team was relocatable. Publicly, and in court filings, the NHL insisted that the NHL and only the NHL could decide that matter and that so long as there was a possibility to sell the team to someone interested in keeping the team in Phoenix they had no interest in considering to move the team anywhere. To some extent this was still their stance in court yesterday but the judge has seemed to effectively shift the debate not to whether the team can be moved to Hamiltion, but what relocation fees the NHL would be entitled to if they did move. Although the judge has yet to issue a ruling, it appears that he will either ask the NHL to come up with a suitable relocation fee (with a rationale for that fee) or possibly mandate the two sides into mediation to negotiate an acceptable relocation fee. Depending on your perspective, this can be viewed as either a win for the leaugue or a win for Balsillie. It’s a win for the league because the judge said that the league owns the Hamilton location and has the right to collect a reasonable fee for use of the Hamilton location. From my perspective it is a loss for the league because once again the court is siding against the league in the argument that the league, and only the league, has complete control of relocation. We don’t know for sure but the judge has hinted he would side against the league so long as there aren’t any firm offers on the table that keeps the team in Phoenix and pays off all the creditors. For Balsillie it is a win because the debate has to some extent shifted from can the team be relocated to Hamilton to what will the price of relocation be and that can only be viewed as a positive.

For much of yesterday the judge seemed to go with the idea of ‘we have one, and only one, offer here for $212.5 million, let’s make it work’ and really didn’t give the NHL any leeway because of expressions of interest from other potential buyers. The judge’s mandate is to the pay off the creditors and as of right now he only sees one way to do that and that is with Balsillie’s offer to purchase the team, but this is where things are going to get real interesting. If the NHL’s ultimate goal is to keep a team out of Hamilton they are going to have to argue that Hamilton is such a prime location for hockey that it deserves a high relocation fee which is just strange because if it is such a good market, why would the NHL be so reluctant to have a team there. Second, they will hope that whatever Balsillie’s final offer is less the relocation fee will not be enough to pay off the creditors in full. So, if there was a $100 million relocation fee and Balsillie was willing to pay $250 million, which would only leave $150 million to pay the creditors. This is interesting because according to Moyes, creditors are owed more than that but the league has argued that the creditors are owed less than that because the loans Moyes made to the team are really not loans but capital infusions. They made those arguments in the context that in reality a bid to keep the franchise in Phoenix only needs to be $120 million in order to pay off all the creditors but those arguments may very well come back to haunt them in the future.

The only other caveat in the Balsillie bid is what the judge will decide the City of Glendale is owed for breaking its lease agreement should the team be relocated. The city has argued that that number is over $500 million but that judge countered with ‘he city feels they have a legal right to have team there until 2035. What about in November if league says ‘we’re done. We’re not paying anymore.’ By that he meant you may not be owed anything because there are no assurances that in the future you will get anything because at some point the NHL could just pull the plug on the team. What the judge determines the city is owed for breaking the contract will go a long way to determine whether a Balsillie bid is able to pay off all the creditors in full but even if he can’t pay off the creditors in full he may still win because as of yet there are no offers to pay off any of the creditors anything let alone in full.
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