Apr 122013
 

The Toronto Maple Leafs shooting percentage has been predicted to fall for a couple of months now but it has held steady. I know that about 5-6 weeks ago the Leafs 5v5 shooting percentage was at 10.4% and I predicted it was sure to fall but as of this morning their 5v5 shooting percentage is even higher at 10.59%. Here is a graph of their 5v5 shooting percentage through out the season.

Toronto Maple Leafs 2012-13 Shooting %

Toronto Maple Leafs 2012-13 Shooting % (shots across x-axis)

League average 5v5 shooting percentage is normally just shy of 8% and the Leafs are about 33% higher than that which is incredibly high. Over the previous 5 seasons only one team has maintained a 5v5 shooting percentage above 10% over the course of an 82 game season and that was the Washington Capitals in 2009-10 when they shot at a 10.39% clip and only a handful of teams have managed to post a 5v5 shooting percentage above 9%. What the Leafs are doing is quite extraordinary even if it is a shortened season. Only 13.4% of the running 50 shot shooting percentage data points in the above graph fall below the typical league average of 8% so about 86.6% of the time they are at or above average in shooting percentage.

The only other team with a 5v5 shooting percentage above 10% this season is the Tampa Bay Lighting but they have been falling back a bit lately and in danger of falling below the 10% line as they currently sit at 10.01%.

Barring a collapse the Leafs should almost certainly end the season with a shooting percentage above 10% but it is difficult to know how much of it is luck/circumstance/randomness and how much is truly skill.

 

Apr 122013
 

Now that I have added home and road stats to stats.hockeyanalysis.com I can take a look at how quality of competition differs when the team is at home vs when they are on the road. In theory because the home team has last change they should be able to dictate the match ups better and thus should be able to drive QoC a bit better. Let’s take a look at the top 10 defensemen in HARO QoC last season at home and on the road (defensemen with 400 5v5 home/road minutes were considered).

Player Name Home HARO QOC Player Name Road HARO QOC
GIRARDI, DAN 8.81 MCDONAGH, RYAN 6.73
MCDONAGH, RYAN 8.49 GORGES, JOSH 6.48
PHANEUF, DION 8.46 GIRARDI, DAN 6.03
GARRISON, JASON 8.27 SUBBAN, P.K. 5.95
GORGES, JOSH 8.25 PHANEUF, DION 5.94
GLEASON, TIM 8.21 GUNNARSSON, CARL 5.48
SUBBAN, P.K. 8.19 ALZNER, KARL 5.35
WEAVER, MIKE 7.92 STAIOS, STEVE 5.15
ALZNER, KARL 7.74 TIMONEN, KIMMO 4.95
REGEHR, ROBYN 7.72 WEAVER, MIKE 4.67

There is definitely a lot of common names in each list but we do notice that the HARO QoC is greater at home than on the road for these defensemen. Next I took a look at the standard deviation of all the defensemen with 400 5v5 home/road minutes last season which should give us an indication of how much QoC varies from player to player.

StdDev
Home 3.29
Road 2.45

The standard deviation is 34% higher at home than on the road which again confirms that variation in QoC are greater at home than on the road.  All of this makes perfect sense but it is nice to see it backed up in actual numbers.

 

 

Apr 112013
 

Stats.hockeyanalysis.com has just gotten even better! Several people have asked why I have zone start adjusted stats for team stats and it is a good question. The answer to that is that it was just easier from a programming point of view to have the same ‘situations’ for both the player level and the team level and since I was already calculating, for example, 5v5close zone start adjusted data for players it was east to add 5v5close zone start adjusted data for teams. Since it makes sense to have non-zone start adjusted data for teams it was on my todo list to get it implemented. So, now it is done, and so much more. The situations that you can access data for at both the player and team level are:

  • 5v5
  • 5v5 home
  • 5v5 road
  • 5v5 close
  • 5v5 tied
  • 5v5 leading
  • 5v5 trailing
  • 5v5 up 1 goal
  • 5v5 up 2+ goals
  • 5v5 down 1 goal
  • 5v5 down 2+ goals
  • 5v4 PP
  • 4v5 PK

In addition to all of the above, all of the above are also available in their Zone Adjusted forms except for the 5v4 PP and 4v5 PK situations. In total, there are now 24 different situations you can search for stats on.  Have at it and don’t blame me for any lost weekends (or lost productivity at work).

(As usual, if you find any issues with the new data please let me know. The stats should be correct but while I have done some testing on the new code to display the stats but it isn’t completely tested.)

 

Apr 112013
 

Every now and again someone asks me how I calculate HARO, HARD and HART ratings that you can find on stats.hockeyanalysis.com and it is at that point I realize that I don’t have an up to date description of how they are calculated so today I endeavor to write one.

First, let me define HARO, HARD and HART.

HARO – Hockey Analysis Rating Offense
HARD – Hockey Analysis Rating Defense
HART – Hockey Analysis Rating Total

So my goal when creating then was to create an offensive defensive and overall total rating for each and every player. Now, here is a step by step guide as to how they are calculated.

Calculate WOWY’s and AYNAY’s

The first step is to calculate WOWY’s (With Or Without You) and AYNAY’s (Against You or Not Against You). You can find goal and corsi WOWY’s and AYNAY’s on stats.hockeyanalysis.com for every player for 5v5, 5v5 ZS adjusted and 5v5 close zone start adjusted situations but I calculate them for every situation you see on stats.hockeyanalysis.com and for shots and fenwick as well but they don’t get posted because it amounts to a massive amounts of data.

(Distraction: 800 players playing against 800 other players means 640,000 data points for each TOI, GF20, GA20, SF20, SA20, FF20, FA20, CF20, CA20 when players are playing against each other and separate of each other per season and situation, or about 17.28 million data points for AYNAY’s for a single season per situation. Now consider when I do my 5 year ratings there are more like 1600 players generating more than 60 million datapoints.)

Calculate TMGF20, TMGA20, OppGF20, OppGA20

What we need the WOWY’s for is to calculate TMGF20 (a TOI with weighted average GF20 of the players teammates when his team mates are not playing with him), TMGA20 (a TOI with weighted average GA20 of the players teammates when his team mates are not playing with him), OppGF20 (a TOI against weighted average GF20 of the players opponents when his opponents are not playing against him) and OppGA20 (a TOI against weighted average GA20 of the players opponents when his opponents are not playing against him).

So, let’s take a look at Alexander Steen’s 5v5 WOWY’s for 2011-12 to look at how TMGF20 is calculated. The columns we are interested in are the Teammate when apart TOI and GF20 columns which I will call TWA_TOI and TWA_GF20. TMGF20 is simply a TWA_TOI (teammate while apart time on ice) weighted average of TWA_GF20. This gives us a good indication of how Steen’s teammates perform offensively when they are not playing with Steen.

TMGA20 is calculated the same way but using TWA_GA20 instead of TWA_GF20. OppGF20 is calculated in a similar manner except using OWA_GF20 (Opponent while apart GF20) and OWA_TOI while OppGA20 uses OWA_GA20.

The reason why I use while not playing with/against data is because I don’t want to have the talent level of the player we are evaluating influencing his own QoT and QoC metrics (which is essentially what TMGF20, TMGA20, OppGF20, OppGA20 are).

Calculate first iteration of HARO and HARD

The first iteration of HARO and HARD are simple. I first calculate an estimated GF20 and an estimated GA20 based on the players teammates and opposition.

ExpGF20 = (TMGF20 + OppGA20)/2
ExpGA20 = (TMGA20 + OppGF20)/2

Then I calculate HARO and HARD as a percentage improvement:

HARO(1st iteration) = 100*(GF20-ExpGF20) / ExpGF20
HARD(1st iteration) = 100*(ExpGA20 – GA20) / ExpGA20

So, a HARO of 20 would mean that when the player is on the goal rate of his team is 20% higher than one would expect based on how his teammates and opponents performed during time when the player is not on the ice with/against them. Similarly, a HARD of 20 would mean the goals against rate of his team is 20% better (lower) than expected.

(Note: The OppGA20 that gets used is from the complimentary situation. For 5v5 this means the opposition situation is also 5v5 but when calculating a rating for 5v5 leading the opposition situation is 5v5 trailing so OppGF20 would be OppGF20 calculated from 5v5 trailing data).

Now for a second iteration

The first iteration used GF20 and GA20 stats which is a good start but after the first iteration we have teammate and opponent corrected evaluations of every player which means we have better data about the quality of teammates and opponents the player has. This is where things get a little more complicated because I need to calculate a QoT and QoC metric based on the first iteration HARO and HARD values and then I need to convert that into a GF20 and GA20 equivalent number so I can compare the players GF20 and GA20 to.

To do this I calculate a TMHARO rating which is a TWA_TOI weighted average of first iteration HARO. TMHARD and OppHARO and OppHARD are calculated in a similar manner. TMHARD, OppHARO and OppHARD are similarly calculated. Now I need to convert these to GF20 and GA20 based stats so I do that by multiplying by league average GF20 (LAGF20) and league average GA20 (LAGA20) and from here I can calculated expected GF20 and expected GA20.

ExpGF20(2nd iteration) = (TMHARO*LAGF20 + OppHARD*LAGA20)/2
ExpGA20(2nd iteration) = (TMHARD*LAGA20 + OppHARD*LAGF20)/2

From there we can get a second iteration of HARO and HARD.

HARO(2nd iteration) = 100*(GF20-ExpGF20) / ExpGF20
HARD(2nd iteration) = 100*(ExpGA20 – GA20) / ExpGA20

Now we iterate again and again…

Now we repeat the above step over and over again using the previous iterations HARO and HARD values at every step.

Now calculate HART

Once we have done enough iterations we can calculate HART from the final iterations HARO and HARD values.

HART = (HARO + HARD) /2

Now do the same for Shot, Fenwick and Corsi data

The above is for goal ratings but I have Shot, Fenwick and Corsi ratings as well and these can be calculated in the exact same way except using SF20, SA20, FF20, FA20, CF20 and CA20.

What about goalies?

Goalies are a little unique in that they only really play the defensive side of the game. For this reason I do not include goalies in calculating TMGF20 and OppGF20. For shot, fenwick and corsi I do not include the goalies on the defensive side of things either as I assume a goalie will not influence shots against (though this may not be entirely true as some goalies may be better at controlling rebounds and thus secondary shots but I’ll assume this is a minimal effect if it does exist). The result of this is goalies do have a HARD rating but no HARO, or shot/fenwick/corsi based HARD or HARO rating.

I hope this helps explain how my hockey analysis ratings are calculated but if you have any followup questions feel free to ask them in the comments.

 

Apr 052013
 

I often get asked questions about hockey analytics, hockey fancy stats, how to use them, what they mean, etc. and there are plenty of good places to find definitions of various hockey stats but sometimes what is more important than a definition is some guidelines on how to use them. So, with that said, here are several tips that I have for people using advanced hockey stats.

Don’t over value Quality of Competition

I don’t know how often I’ll point out one players poor stats or another players good stats and immediately get the response “Yeah, but he always plays against the opponents best players” or “Yeah, but he doesn’t play against the oppositions best players” but most people that say that kind of thing have no real idea how much quality of opponent will affect the players statistics. The truth is it is not nearly as much as you might think.  Despite some coaches desperately trying to employ line matching techniques the variation in quality of competition metric is dwarfed by variation in quality of teammates, individual talent, and on-ice results. An analysis of Pavel Datsyuk and Valterri Filppula showed that if Filppula had Datsyuk’s quality of competition his CorsiFor% would drop from 51.05% to 50.90% and his GoalsFor% would drop from 55.65% to 55.02%. In the grand scheme of things, this are relatively minor factors.

Don’t over value Zone Stats either

Like quality of competition, many people will use zone starts to justify a players good/poor statistics. The truth is zone starts are not a significant factor either. I have found that the effect of zone starts is largely eliminated after about 10 seconds after a face off and this has been found true by others as well. I account for zone starts in statistics by eliminating the 10 seconds after an offensive or defensive zone face off and I have found doing this has relatively little effect on a players stats. Henrik Sedin is maybe the most extreme case of a player getting primarily offensive zone starts and all those zone starts took him from a 55.2 fenwick% player to a 53.8% fenwick% player when zone starts are factored out. In the most extreme case there is only a 1.5% impact on a players fenwick% and the majority of players are no where close to the zone start bias of Henrik Sedin. For the majority of players you are probably talking something under 0.5% impact on their fenwick%. As for individual stats over the last 3 seasons H. Sedin had 34 goals and 172 points in 5v5 situations and just 2 goals and 14 points came within 10 seconds of a zone face off, or about 5 points a year. If instead of 70% offensive zone face off deployment he had 50% offensive zone face off deployment instead of having 14 points during the 10 second zone face off time he may have had 10.  That’s a 4 point differential over 3 years for a guy who scored 172 points. In simple terms, about 2.3% of H. Sedin’s 5v5 points can be attributed to his offensive zone start bias.

A derivative of this is that if zone starts don’t matter much, a players face off winning percentage probably doesn’t matter much either which is consistent with other studies. It’s a nice skill to have, but not worth a lot either.

Do not ignore Quality of Teammates

I have just told you to pretty much ignore quality of competition and zone starts, what about quality of teammates? Well, to put it simply, do not ignore them. Quality of teammates matters and matters a lot. Sticking with the Vancouver Canucks, lets use Alex Burrows as an example. Burrows mostly plays with the Sedin twins but has played on Kesler’s line a bit too. Over the past 3 seasons he has played about 77.9% of his ice time with H. Sedin and about 12.3% of his ice time with Ryan Kesler and the reminder with Malhotra and others. Burrow’s offensive production is significantly better when playing with H. Sedin as 88.7% of his goals and 87.2% of his points came during the 77.9% ice time he played with H. Sedin. If Burrows played 100% of his ice time with H. Sedin and produced at the same rate he would have scored 6 (9.7%) more goals and 13 (11%) more 5v5 points over the past 3 seasons. This is far more significant than the 2.3% boost H. Sedin saw from all his offensive zone starts and I am not certain my Burrows example is the most extreme example in the NHL. How many more points would an average 3rd line get if they played mostly with H. Sedin instead of the average 3rd liner. Who you play with matters a lot. You can’t look at Tyler Bozak’s decent point totals and conclude he is a decent player without considering he plays a lot with Kessel and Lupul, two very good offensive players.

Opportunity is not talent

Kind of along the same lines as the Quality of Teammates discussion, we must be careful not to confuse opportunity and results. Over the past 2 seasons Corey Perry has the second most goals of any forward in the NHL trailing only Steven Stamkos. That might seem impressive but it is a little less so when you consider Perry also had the 4th most 5v5 minutes during that time and the 11th most 5v4 minutes.  Perry is a good goal scorer but a lot of his goals come from opportunity (ice time) as much as individual talent. Among forwards with at least 1500 minutes of 5v5 ice time the past 2 seasons, Perry ranks just 30th in goals per 60 minutes of ice time. That’s still good, but far less impressive than second only to Steven Stamkos and he is actually well behind teammate Bobby Ryan (6th) in this metric. Perry is a very good player but he benefits more than others by getting a lot of ice time  and PP ice time. Perry’s goal production is a large part talent, but also somewhat opportunity driven and we need to keep this in perspective.

Don’t ignore the percentages (shooting and save)

The percentages matter, particularly shooting percentages. I have shown that players can sustain elevated on-ice shooting percentages and I have shown that players can have an impact on their line mates shooting percentages and Tom Awad has shown that a significant portion of the difference between good players and bad players is finishing ability (shooting percentage).  There is even evidence that goal based metrics (which incorporate the percentages) are a better predictor of post season success than fenwick based metric. What corsi/fenwick metrics have going for them is more reliability over small sample sizes but once you approach a full seasons worth of data that benefit is largely gone and you get more benefit from having the percentages factored into the equation. If you want to get a better understanding of what considering the percentages can do for you, try to do a Malkin vs Gomez comparison or a Crosby vs Tyler Kennedy comparison over the past several years. Gomez and Kennedy actually look like relatively decent comparisons if you just consider shot based metrics, but both are terrible percentage players while Malkin and Crosby are excellent percentage players and it is the percentages that make Malkin and Crosby so special. This is an extreme example but the percentages should not be ignored if you want a true representation of a players abilities.

More is definitely better

One of the reason many people have jumped on the shot attempt/corsi/fenwick band wagon is because they are more frequent events than goals and thus give you more reliable metrics. This is true over small sample sizes but as explained above, the percentages matter too and should not be ignored. Luckily, for most players we have ample data to get past the sample size issues. There is no reason to evaluate a player based on half a seasons data if that player has been in the league for several years. Look at 2, 3, 4 years of data.  Look for trends. Is the player consistently a higher corsi player? Is the player consistently a high shooting percentage player? Is the player improving? Declining? I have shown on numerous occassions that goals are a better predictor of future goal rates than corsi/fenwick starting at about one year of data but multiple years are definitely better. Any conclusion about a players talent level using a single season of data or less (regardless of whether it is corsi or goal based) is subject to a significant level of uncertainty. We have multiple years of data for the majority of players so use it. I even aggregate multiple years into one data set for you on stats.hockeyanalysis.com for you so it isn’t even time consuming. The data is there, use it. More is definitely better.

WOWY’s are where it is at

In my mind WOWY’s are the best tool for advanced player evaluation. WOWY stands for with or without you and looks at how a player performs while on the ice with a team mate and while on the ice without a team mate. What WOWY’s can tell you is whether a particular player is a core player driving team success or a player along for the ride. Players that consistently make their team mates statistics better when they are on the ice with them are the players you want on your team. Anze Kopitar is an example of a player who consistently makes his teammates better. Jack Johnson is an example of a player that does not, particularly when looking at goal based metrics.   Then there are a large number of players that are good players that neither drive your teams success nor hold it back, or as I like to say, complementary players. Ideally you build your team around a core of players like Kopitar that will drive success and fill it in with a group of complementary players and quickly rid yourself of players like Jack Johnson that act as drags on the team.

 

Apr 052013
 

Yesterday HabsEyesOnThePrize.com had a post on the importance of fenwick come playoff time over the past 5 seasons. It is definitely worth a look so go check it out. In the post they look at FF% in 5v5close situations and see how well it translates into post season success. I wanted to take this a step further and take a look at PDO and GF% in 5v5close situations to see of they translate into post season success as well.  Here is what I found:

Group N Avg Playoff Avg Cup Winners Lost Cup Finals Lost Third Round Lost Second Round Lost First Round Missed Playoffs
GF% > 55 19 2.68 2.83 5 1 2 6 4 1
GF% 50-55 59 1.22 1.64 0 2 6 10 26 15
GF% 45-50 52 0.62 1.78 0 2 2 4 10 34
GF% <45 20 0.00 - 0 0 0 0 0 20
FF% > 53 23 2.35 2.35 3 2 4 5 9 0
FF% 50-53 55 1.15 1.70 2 2 1 10 22 18
FF% 47-50 46 0.52 1.85 0 0 4 3 6 33
FF% <47 26 0.54 2.00 0 1 1 2 3 19
PDO >1010 27 1.63 2.20 2 2 2 6 8 7
PDO 1000-1010 42 1.17 1.75 1 0 5 7 15 14
PDO 990-1000 47 0.91 1.95 2 1 3 4 12 25
PDO <990 34 0.56 1.90 0 2 0 3 5 24

I have grouped GF%, FF% and PDO into four categories each, the very good, the good, the mediocre and the bad and I have looked at how many teams made it to each round of the playoffs from each group. If we say that winning the cup is worth 5 points, getting to the finals is worth 4, getting to the 3rd round is worth 3, getting to the second round is worth 2, and making the playoffs is worth 1, then the Avg column is the average point total for the teams in that grouping.  The Playoff Avg is the average point total for teams that made the playoffs.

As HabsEyesOnThePrize.com found, 5v5close FF% is definitely an important factor in making the playoffs and enjoying success in the playoffs. That said, GF% seems to be slightly more significant. All 5 Stanley Cup winners came from the GF%>55 group while only 3 cup winners came from the FF%>53 group and both Avg and PlayoffAvg are higher in the GF%>55 group than the FF%>53 group. PDO only seems marginally important, though teams that have a very good PDO do have a slightly better chance to go deeper into the playoffs. Generally speaking though, if you are trying to predict a Stanley Cup winner, looking at 5v5close GF% is probably a better metric than looking at 5v5close FF% and certainly better than PDO. Now, considering this is a significantly shorter season than usual, this may not be the case as luck may be a bit more of a factor in GF% than usual but historically this has been the case.

So, who should we look at for playoff success this season?  Well, there are currently 9 teams with a 5v5close GF% > 55.  Those are Anaheim, Boston, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, Montreal, Chicago, San Jose, Toronto and Vancouver. No other teams are above 52.3% so that is a list unlikely to get any new additions to it before seasons end though some could certainly fall out of the above 55% list. Now if we also only consider teams that have a 5v5close FF% >50% then Toronto and Anaheim drop off the list leaving you with Boston, Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, Montreal, Chicago, San Jose and Vancouver as your Stanley Cup favourites, but we all pretty much knew that already didn’t we?

 

Apr 012013
 

I have been on a bit of a mission recently to push the idea that quality of competition (and zone starts) is not a huge factor in ones statistics and that most people in general over value its importance. I don’t know how often I hear arguments like “but he plays all the tough minutes” as an excuse as to why a player has poor statistics and pretty much every time I do I cringe because almost certainly the person making the argument has no clue how much those tough minutes impact a players statistics.

While thinking of how to do this study, and which players to look at, I was listening to a pod cast and the name Pavel Datsyuk was brought up so I decided I would take a look at him because in addition to being mentioned in a pod cast he is a really good 2-way player who plays against pretty tough quality of competition. For this study I looked at 2010-12 two year data and Datsyuk has the 10th highest HART QoC during that time in 5v5 zone start adjusted situations.

The next step was to look how Datsyuk performed against various types of opposition. To do this I took all of Datsyuk’s opponent forwards who had he played at least 10 minutes of 5v5 ZS adjusted ice time against (you can find these players here) and grouped them according to their HARO, HARD, CorHARO and CorHARD ratings and looked at how Datsyuk’s on-ice stats looked against each group.

OppHARO TOI% GA20
>1.1 46.84% 0.918
0.9-1.1 34.37% 0.626
<0.9 18.79% 0.391

Lets go through a quick explanation of the above table. I have grouped Datsyuk’s opponents by their HARO ratings into three groups, those with a HARO >1.1, those with a HARO between 0.9 and 1.1 and those with a HARO rating below 0.9. These groups represent strong offensive players, average offensive players and weak offensive players. Datsyuk played 46.84% of his ice time against the strong offensive player group, 34.37% against the average offensive player group and 18.79% against the weak offensive player group. The GA20 column is Datsyuk’s goals against rate, or essentially the goals for rate of Datsyuk’s opponents when playing against Datsyuk. As you can see, the strong offensive players do significantly better than the average offensive players who in turn do significantly better than the weak offensive players.

Now, let’s look at how Datsyuk does offensively based on the defensive ability of his opponents.

OppHARD TOI% GF20
>1.1 35.39% 1.171
0.9-1.1 35.36% 0.994
<0.9 29.25% 1.004

Interestingly, the defensive quality of Datsyuk’s opponents did not have a significant impact on Datsyuk’s ability to generate offense which is kind of an odd result.

Here are the same tables but for corsi stats.

OppCorHARO TOI% CA20
>1.1 15.59% 15.44
0.9-1.1 77.79% 13.78
<0.9 6.63% 10.84

 

OppCorHARD TOI% CF20
>1.1 18.39% 15.89
0.9-1.1 68.81% 18.49
<0.9 12.80% 22.69

I realize that I should have tightened up the ratings splits to get a more even distribution in TOI% but I think we see the effect of QoC fine. When looking at corsi we do see that CF20 varies across defensive quality of opponent which we didn’t see with GF20.

From the tables above, we do see that quality of opponent can have a significant impact on a players statistics. When you are playing against good offensive opponents you are bound to give up a lot more goals than you will against weaker offensive opponents. The question remains is whether players can and do play a significantly greater amount of time against good opponents compared to other players. To take a look at this I looked at the same tables above but for Valtteri Filppula, a player who rarely gets to play with Datsyuk so in theory could have a significantly different set of opponents to Datsyuk. Here are the same tables above for Filppula.

OppHARO TOI% GA20
>1.1 42.52% 1.096
0.9-1.1 35.35% 0.716
<0.9 22.12% 0.838

 

OppHARD TOI% GF20
>1.1 32.79% 0.841
0.9-1.1 35.53% 1.197
<0.9 31.68% 1.370

 

OppCorHARO TOI% GA20
>1.1 12.88% 19.03
0.9-1.1 78.20% 16.16
<0.9 8.92% 14.40

 

OppCorHARD TOI% GF20
>1.1 20.89% 15.48
0.9-1.1 64.94% 17.16
<0.9 14.17% 19.09

Nothing too exciting or unexpected in those tables. What is more important is how the ice times differ from Datsyuk’s across groups and how those differences might affect Filppula’s statistics.

We see that Datsyuk plays a little bit more against good offensive players and a little bit less against weak offensive players and he also plays a little bit more against good defensive players and a little bit less against weak defensive players. If we assume that Filppula played Datsyuk’s and that Datsyuk’s within group QoC ratings was the same as Filppula’s we can calculate what Filppula’s stats will be against similar QoC.

Actual w/ DatsyukTOI
GF20 1.135 1.122
GA20 0.905 0.917
GF% 55.65% 55.02%
CF20 17.08 17.09
CA20 16.37 16.49
CF% 51.05% 50.90%

As you can see, that is not a huge difference. If we gave Filppula the same QoC as Datsyuk instead of being a 55.65% GF% player he’d be a 55.02% GF% player. That is hardly enough to worry about and the difference in CF% is even less.

From this an any other study I have looked at I have found very little evidence that QoC has a significant impact on a players statistics. The argument that a player can have bad stats because he plays the ‘tough minutes’ is, in my opinion, a bogus argument. Player usage can have a small impact on a players statistics but it is not anything to be concerned with for the vast majority of players and it will never make a good player have bad statistics or a bad player have good statistics. Player usage charts (such as those found here or those found here) are interesting and pretty neat and do give you an idea of how a coach uses his players but as a tool for justifying a players good, or poor, performance they are not. The notion of ‘tough minutes’ exists, but are not all that important over the long haul.

 

 

Mar 202013
 

I generally think that the majority of people give too much importance to quality of competition (QoC) and its impact on a players statistics but if we are going to use QoC metrics let’s at least try and use the best ones available. In this post I will take a look at some QoC metrics that are available on stats.hockeyanalysis.com and explain why they might be better than those typically in use.

OppGF20, OppGA20, OppGF%

These three stats are the average GF20 (on ice goals for per 20 minutes), OppGA20 (on ice goals against per 20 minutes) and GF% (on ice GF / [on ice GF + on ice GA]) of all the opposition players that a player lined up against weighted by ice time against. In fact, these stats go a bit further in that they remove the ice time the opponent players played against the player so that a player won’t influence his own QoC (not nearly as important as QoT but still a good thing to do). So, essentially these three stats are the goal scoring ability of the opposition players, the goal defending ability of the opposition players, and the overall value of the opposition players. Note that opposition goalies are not included in the calculation of OppGF20 as it is assume the goalies have no influence on scoring goals.

The benefits of using these stats are they are easy to understand and are in a unit (goals per 20 minutes of ice time) that is easily understood. GF20 is essentially how many goals we expect the players opponents would score on average per 20 minutes of ice time. The drawback from this stat is that if good players play against good players and bad players play against bad players a good player and a bad player may have similar statistics but the good players is a better player because he did it against better quality opponents. There is no consideration for the context of the opponents statistics and that may matter.

Let’s take a look at the top 10 forwards in OppGF20 last season.

Player Team OppGF20
Patrick Dwyer Carolina 0.811
Brandon Sutter Carolina 0.811
Travis Moen Montreal 0.811
Carl Hagelin NY Rangers 0.806
Marcel Goc Florida 0.804
Tomas Plekanec Montreal 0.804
Brooks Laich Washington 0.800
Ryan Callahan NY Rangers 0.799
Patrik Elias New Jersey 0.798
Alexei Ponikarovsky New Jersey 0.795

You will notice that every single player is from the eastern conference. The reason for this is that the eastern conference is a more offensive conference. Taking a look at the top 10 players in OppGA20 will show the opposite.

Player Team OppGF20
Marcus Kruger Chicago 0.719
Jamal Mayers Chicago 0.720
Mark Letestu Columbus 0.721
Andrew Brunette Chicago 0.723
Andrew Cogliano Anaheim 0.723
Viktor Stalberg Chicago 0.724
Matt Halischuk Nashville 0.724
Kyle Chipchura Phoenix 0.724
Matt Belesky Anaheim 0.724
Cory Emmerton Detroit 0.724

Now, what happens when we look at OppGF%?

Player Team OppGF%
Mike Fisher Nashville 51.6%
Martin Havlat San Jose 51.4%
Vaclav Prospal Columbus 51.3%
Mike Cammalleri Calgary 51.3%
Martin Erat Nashville 51.3%
Sergei Kostitsyn Nashville 51.3%
Dave Bolland Chicago 51.2%
Rick Nash Columbus 51.2%
Travis Moen Montreal 51.0%
Patrick Marleau San Jose 51.0%

There are predominantly western conference teams with a couple of eastern conference players mixed in. The reason for this western conference bias is that the western conference was the better conference and thus it makes sense that the QoC would be tougher for western conference players.

OppFF20, OppFA20, OppFF%

These are exactly the same stats as the goal based stats above but instead of using goals for/against/percentage they use fenwick for/against/percentage (fenwick is shots + shots that missed the net). I won’t go into details but you can find the top players in OppFF20 here, in OppFA20 here, and OppFF% here. You will find a a lot of similarities to the OppGF20, OppGA20 and OppGF% lists but if you ask me which I think is a better QoC metric I’d lean towards the goal based ones. The reason for this is that the smaller sample size issues we see with goal statistics is not going to be nearly as significant in the QoC metrics because over all opponents luck will average out (for every unlucky opponent you are likely to have a lucky one t cancel out the effects). That said, if you are doing a fenwick based analysis it probably makes more sense to use a fenwick based QoC metric.

HARO QoC, HARD QoC, HART QoC

As stated above, one of the flaws of the above QoC metrics is that there is no consideration for the context of the opponents statistics. One of the ways around this is to use the HockeyAnalysis.com HARO (offense), HARD (defense) and HART (Total/Overall) ratings in calculating QoC. These are player ratings that take into account both quality of teammates and quality of competition (here is a brief explanation of what these ratings are).The HARO QoC, HARD QoC and HART QoC metrics are simply the average HARO, HARD and HART ratings of players opponents.

Here are the top 10 forwards in HARO QoC last year:

Player Team HARO QoC
Patrick Dwyer Carolina 6.0
Brandon Sutter Carolina 5.9
Travis Moen Montreal 5.8
Tomas Plekanec Montreal 5.8
Marcel Goc Florida 5.6
Carl Hagelin NY Rangers 5.5
Ryan Callahan NY Rangers 5.3
Brooks Laich Washington 5.3
Michael Grabner NY Islanders 5.2
Patrik Elias New Jersey 5.2

There are a lot of similarities to the OppGF20 list with the eastern conference dominating. There are a few changes, but not too many, which really is not that big of a surprise to me knowing that there is very little evidence that QoC has a significant impact on a players statistics and thus considering the opponents QoC will not have a significant impact on the opponents stats and thus not a significant impact on a players QoC. That said, I believe these should produce slightly better QoC ratings. Also note that a 6.0 HARO QoC indicates that the opponent players are expected to produce a 6.0% boost on the league average GF20.

Here are the top 10 forwards in HARD QoC last year:

Player Team HARD QoC
Jamal Mayers Chicago 6.0
Marcus Kruger Chicago 5.9
Mark Letestu Columbus 5.8
Tim Jackman Calgary 5.3
Colin Fraser Los Angeles 5.2
Cory Emmerton Detroit 5.2
Matt Belesky Anaheim 5.2
Kyle Chipchura Phoenix 5.1
Andrew Brunette Chicago 5.1
Colton Gilles Columbus 5.0

And now the top 10 forwards in HART QoC last year:

Player Team HART QoC
Dave Bolland Chicago 3.2
Martin Havlat San Jose 3.0
Mark Letestu Columbus 2.5
Jeff Carter Los Angeles 2.5
Derick Brassard Columbus 2.5
Rick Nash Columbus 2.4
Mike Fisher Nashville 2.4
Vaclav Prospal Columbus 2.2
Ryan Getzlaf Anaheim 2.2
Viktor Stalberg Chicago 2.1

Shots and Corsi based QoC

You can also find similar QoC stats using shots as the base stat or using corsi (shots + shots that missed the net + shots that were blocked) on stats.hockeyanalysis.com but they are all the same as above so I’ll not go into them in any detail.

CorsiRel QoC

The most common currently used QoC metric seems to be CorsiRel QoC (found on behindthenet.ca) but in my opinion this is not so much a QoC metric but a ‘usage’ metric. CorsiRel is a statistic that compares the teams corsi differential when the player is on the ice to the teams corsi differential when they player is not on the ice.  CorsiRel QoC is the average CorsiRel of all the players opponents.

The problem with CorsiRel is that good players on a bad team with little depth can put up really high CorsiRel stats compared to similarly good players on a good team with good depth because essentially it is comparing a player relative to his teammates. The more good teammates you have, the more difficult it is to put up a good CorsiRel. So, on any given team the players with a good CorsiRel are the best players on team team but you can’t compare CorsiRel on players on different teams because the quality of the teams could be different.

CorsiRel QoC is essentially the average CorsiRel of all the players opponents but because CorsiRel is flawed, CorsiRel QoC ends up being flawed too. For players on the same team, the player with the highest CorsiRel QoC plays against the toughest competition so in this sense it tells us who is getting the toughest minutes on the team, but again CorsiRel QoC is not really that useful when comparing players across teams.  For these reasons I consider CorsiRel QoC more of a tool to see the usage of a player compared to his teammates, but is not in my opinion a true QoC metric.

I may be biased, but in my opinion there is no reason to use CorsiRel QoC anymore. Whether you use GF20, GA20, GF%, HARO QoC, HARD QoC, and HART QoC, or any of their shot/fenwick/corsi variants they should all produce better QoC measures that are comparable across teams (which is the major draw back of CorsiRel QoC.

 

Mar 152013
 

A few people didn’t like that I suggested that Jay McClement was a bad player in yesterday’s Mikhail Grabovski post so I thought I would provide a visual representation of McClement’s  mediocrity in the form of 5v5 Zone Start adjusted CF% WOWY charts for each of the past 6 seasons (this season included).

Let’s start with this current season even though the sample size is relatively small and so the number of line mates with a reasonable number of minutes with McClement is relatively small.

McClementCFPctWOWY201213

In this chart, it is better for McClement to have the bubbles below and to the right of the diagional line indicating his teammates corsi for % improved when they were on the ice with McClement. As you can see, none did.

So, what about previous seasons?

Continue reading »

Mar 142013
 

Mikhail Grabovski is starting to get a little heat in Toronto. The other night against Winnipeg he benched for a good chunk of the game and people are starting to question what is wrong with Grabovski this season. Truth is, there is probably nothing wrong with Grabovski except for his line mate Jay McClement.

When one looks at Grabovski’s stats this season you will actually see that his 5v5 Goals/60 is actually up this year to 0.946 goals per 60 minutes of play from 0.895 last year and 0.924 the year before so his 5v5 goal production is certainly there. It is his assist totals that are down dramatically. The problem is his most frequent line mates are Nikolai Kulemin, Jay McClement and Leo Komarov, none of which are dynamic offensive players. McClement has never scored more than 12 goals in any season in his career and Kulemen had a 30 goal season in 2010-11 but never more than 16 otherwise and has just 9 goals in his last 97 games and Komarov is a rookie not known for his offensive ability. You can’t expect Grabovski, who probably isn’t a dynamic playmaking center to start with, to rack up a lot of assists with a pair of third line players on his wing.

On top of that, Jay McClement is actually a pretty bad hockey player. When the Leafs signed McClement in the summer I questioned the signing because he had terrible numbers in Colorado the previous 2 seasons.  In fact, over the past 2 seasons in Colorado and St. Louis he was 4th last in the league in 5v5 ZS Adjusted goals against per 20 minutes (sadly ahead of only Kessel, Bozak and Lupul). He also ranked 230th of 258 in terms of fenwick % over those 2 years. This season he is last on the Leafs in zone start adjusted fenwick % at a terrible 41.1%.

On top of McClement being pretty bad, the player McClement replaced on that line, Clarke MacArthur, is pretty good. MacArthur has the best fenwick % on the Leafs this season and in the 58:11 of 5v5 ice time he and Grabovski played together this year they had a corsi % of 57.1% while Graobovski has been at 41.7% when separated from MacArthur. Last season when Grabovski and MacArthur played together they were at 56.0% and when Grabovski was without MacArthur he was at 50.9%. In 2010-11 Grabovski’s corsi% was 55.3% with MacArthur and 47.0% without.

In summary, there is nothing wrong with Grabovski. It is the coach that took a good player who had very good ‘chemistry’ with Grabovski off Grabovski’s line replacing him with at best a mediocre 3rd liner to go with the other 3rd liner on his other wing. Maybe when Lupul comes back Carlyle will be forced to put a real top 6 winger on the Grabovski line and then people will stop asking “What is wrong with Grabovski?” but until then, blame Jay McClement (with a primary assist to Randy Carlyle).