Apr 122013
 

Now that I have added home and road stats to stats.hockeyanalysis.com I can take a look at how quality of competition differs when the team is at home vs when they are on the road. In theory because the home team has last change they should be able to dictate the match ups better and thus should be able to drive QoC a bit better. Let’s take a look at the top 10 defensemen in HARO QoC last season at home and on the road (defensemen with 400 5v5 home/road minutes were considered).

Player Name Home HARO QOC Player Name Road HARO QOC
GIRARDI, DAN 8.81 MCDONAGH, RYAN 6.73
MCDONAGH, RYAN 8.49 GORGES, JOSH 6.48
PHANEUF, DION 8.46 GIRARDI, DAN 6.03
GARRISON, JASON 8.27 SUBBAN, P.K. 5.95
GORGES, JOSH 8.25 PHANEUF, DION 5.94
GLEASON, TIM 8.21 GUNNARSSON, CARL 5.48
SUBBAN, P.K. 8.19 ALZNER, KARL 5.35
WEAVER, MIKE 7.92 STAIOS, STEVE 5.15
ALZNER, KARL 7.74 TIMONEN, KIMMO 4.95
REGEHR, ROBYN 7.72 WEAVER, MIKE 4.67

There is definitely a lot of common names in each list but we do notice that the HARO QoC is greater at home than on the road for these defensemen. Next I took a look at the standard deviation of all the defensemen with 400 5v5 home/road minutes last season which should give us an indication of how much QoC varies from player to player.

StdDev
Home 3.29
Road 2.45

The standard deviation is 34% higher at home than on the road which again confirms that variation in QoC are greater at home than on the road.  All of this makes perfect sense but it is nice to see it backed up in actual numbers.

 

 

  3 Responses to “Home vs Road QoC”

  1.  

    A few critiques on this:

    1) You’re bringing in people from links who aren’t completely familiar with all the stats, so it would be helpful if you provided either the definition of or the link to HARO. While I’m familiar with QoC, I had no clue what HARO was other than to deduce that Home And Road was likely the first part based on the content of the article. Offense was never mentioned in the article other than in the acronym.

    2) I’m not sure that a top 10 from home and a top 10 from road is the best comparison. I think you’d be better off comparing the guys from the top ten on home to their own stats for road (and vice versa) or everybody on the home vs. road (with some sort of games played cutoff).

    3) Wouldn’t an ANOVA be a great way to detect if the difference in variability is significant or not? I’m guessing it would be based on the standard deviation difference, but isn’t it always better to prove it rather than just point out raw numbers?

  2.  

    My bad, ignore number 2. I didn’t read closely enough. I missed the points that you included all players in your SD calculations.

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